Wednesday, April 15, 2015

M is for Measles




On Day 13 of the A - Z Challenge, M is for Measles



There has been a measles outbreak which has some states trying to force parents to vaccinate their children.  The MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine has been a point of contention for some parents who believe their children's autism was caused by this vaccine as well as for the parents that refuse to vaccinate because they are afraid it will cause autism in their healthy children.  The CDC claims the vaccine is safe and does not cause autism.   

Before my sons were old enough for the MMR vaccine, I started asking questions and doing research.  We were aware of the vaccine controversy and wanted to make an informed decision.  What I learned was that the MMR was composed of live virus.  The theory of those who believe the MMR vaccine causes autism is that there is too much live virus in that one shot.  Several doctors believe this can cause encephalitis (inflammation) in the brain of some children causing autism.  I mentioned my dilemma with one of my doctors in a casual conversation and she gave me the name of a highly respected Brown University medical doctor who was researching this very issue.  

I spoke with this esteemed doctor by telephone and while he believes the MMR caused his own grandson's autism, he also believes children should be vaccinated.   His recommendation: splitting up the shots.  Prior to 1971, these vaccines were given separately.  I obtained prescriptions from my pediatrician and ordered the vaccines separately.  They were given 6 months apart.  We had no severe reactions and I am confident that this was the best decision for us.










10 comments:

  1. I'm hugely pro-vaccine. I guess it's from being raised in a family of doctors. And the fact that the autism/vaccine connection, or the doctor who published his findings turned out to be fraudulent. It makes me sad that people don't do further research, like you did and that they're exposing people who are too young to be vaccinated, or immuno-compromised, or the elderly.

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    1. I know some have proved to be fraudulent, but I do believe the vaccine/autism connection. Autism was 1 in 250 in 2000 when I became pregnant with my son and is now 1 in 68. 13 years is too short of a time to be 'genetic', or 'better diagnosis'. I believe big pharma is hiding information and the CDC is enabling if not also hiding. I also believe that vaccinations can be done safely, in the MMR case, by splitting up the components of the vaccine. Come back for my V post.

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  2. I know people who still refuse to have their kids vaccinated. Good friends. But these are folks who will believe anything they read or see on TV by people they know nothing about.

    Stephen Tremp
    A to Z Cohost
    M is for Movies

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    1. Hi Stephen - I truly believe there is some truth regarding the vaccine/autism link. But people just hear vaccines cause autism and don't vaccinate which I think is reckless - come visit on V day as I will go into what my research has led me to believe and how I also FULLY vaccinated my boys.

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  3. How interesting! I've never heard this before, that one could split up the shots. Good research work. I know it's a hot issue for many parents.
    Maui Jungalow

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    1. Prior to 1971, the measles, mumps and rubella shots were given separately. I am totally convinced of the vaccine/autism link, but not because of the vaccines themselves. It is the way they are given that I believe is the problem. I plan to go in more detail on the V day of the challenge. xoxo

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    2. Some people just hear the word vaccine and shut down. We won't know really the effects of the things we do medically until maybe a full generation later. Remember doctors used to be in cigarette ads in magazines, promoting smoking. Now it's a no-no. We hear information and go one way, and it turns out 20 years later, it was totally wrong.

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    3. I think the problem is that people keep hearing 'vaccines cause autism' where I believe the thimerosal is the trigger. But a lot of people just hone in on the word vaccine and then say they are not going to get them. And yes, down the road look what happened with Agent Orange and tobacco. But I think big pharma wants this quiet, just too many affected should evidence come to light proving the vaccine/autism link. They have to protect their profits...

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  4. Judi, like you, I had to make this decision when it came to innoculating my daughter. Unusually, my family doctor recommended separate vaccination - but she was a spirited individual. I'm already looking forward to reading your V post.
    Whilst undoubtedly a difficult decision for parents to make, the outbreaks of these childhood diseases is undeniably on the increase. If there hadn't been the option for separate vaccination, I'm not sure what side of the fence I'd have fallen.

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    1. They don't make it easy Deb that's for sure. It was very expensive to get the vaccines separately, but I would not have done it any other way. I don't like the schedule of vaccines, they are giving too many too fast. We fully vaccinated my sons (except flu, cuz of egg allergy) and we worked with our pediatrician to space out some shots so they didn't get 4 different ones in one visit. Make sure you visit my V post! xoxo

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